Diet

Ask the Expert Panel: Nutrition and Diet Roundtable – Bodybuilding.com | Update

In nutrition, diet is the sum of food consumed by a person or other organism. The word diet often implies the use of specific intake of nutrition for health or weight-management reasons (with the two often being related). Although humans are omnivores, each culture and each person holds some food preferences or some food taboos. This may be due to personal tastes or ethical reasons. Individual dietary choices may be more or less healthy.

Complete nutrition requires ingestion and absorption of vitamins, minerals, essential amino acids from protein and essential fatty acids from fat-containing food, also food energy in the form of carbohydrate, protein, and fat. Dietary habits and choices play a significant role in the quality of life, health and longevity.



There are thousands of diets. Some are for losing weight, while others are for gaining weight, lowering cholesterol, living a long and healthful life, and many other reasons.

A diet is best described as a fixed plan of eating and drinking where the type and amount of food are planned out in order to achieve weight loss or follow a particular lifestyle.

Here are some diets that are popular in the community

1. Mediterranean diet
The emphasis is on lots of plant foods, fresh fruits as dessert, beans, nuts, whole grains, seeds, olive oil as the main source of dietary fats. Cheese and yogurts are the main dairy foods. The diet also includes moderate amounts of fish and poultry, up to about four eggs per week, small amounts of red meat, and low to moderate amounts of wine.

2. Raw food diet
The raw food diet, or raw foodism, involves consuming foods and drinks that are not processed, are completely plant-based, and ideally organic.

3. Vegan diet
Veganism is more of a way of life and a philosophy than a diet. A vegan does not eat anything that is animal-based, including eggs, dairy, and honey. Vegans do not usually adopt veganism just for health reasons, but also for environmental, ethical, and compassionate reasons.

4. Vegetarian diet
The majority of vegetarians are lacto-ovo vegetarians, in other words, they do not eat animal-based foods, except for eggs, dairy, and honey.

Studies over the last few years have shown that vegetarians have a lower body weight, suffer less from diseases, and typically have a longer life expectancy than people who eat meat.

5. Ketogenic diet
The ketogenic diet has been used for decades as a treatment for epilepsy and is also being explored for other uses. It involves reducing carbohydrate intake and upping fat intake. It sounds contrary to common sense, but it allows the body to burn fat as a fuel, rather than carbohydrates.

6. Atkins diet
The Atkins diet, or Atkins nutritional approach, focuses on controlling the levels of insulin in the body through a low-carbohydrate diet.



If people consume large amounts of refined carbohydrates, their insulin levels rise and fall rapidly. Rising insulin levels trigger the body to store energy from the food that is consumed, making it less likely that the body will use stored fat as a source of energy.

Therefore, people on the Atkins diet avoid carbohydrates but can eat as much protein and fat as they like.
Although popular for some time, the Atkins Diet comes with certain risks. Individuals considering the Atkins Diet should speak with their doctor.

A healthy diet may improve or maintain optimal health. In developed countries, affluence enables unconstrained caloric intake and possibly inappropriate food choices.



Health agencies recommend that people maintain a normal weight by limiting consumption of energy-dense foods and sugary drinks, eating plant-based food, limiting consumption of red and processed meat, and limiting alcohol intake.

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans is an evidence-based information source that policy makers and health professionals use to advise the general public about healthy nutrition.









Expert Panel: Everything You Need To Know About Nutrition! More diets than ever seem to offer you life-changing results—and have research to back them up. So which one is for you? Two of the best minds in muscle meet up to give you the lowdown!

Read the full article: http://bbcom.me/1MRaGIE

What will you eat today? You have a world of choices, and a world of people ready to tell you why you’ve chosen wrong. It can be overwhelming, especially because sometimes it seems like your very life—or at least the life your six-pack, hard-earned muscle mass, or other aesthetic goal—is at stake. So where do you start? Start here!

In the second of our expert panel roundtable discussions, we invited Dr. Jacob Wilson and Dr. Robert Wildman to discuss the fundamentals of goal-based nutrition and how the scientific landscape is rapidly changing. They break down some of the rules that should guide trainees with a range of goals, from losing large quantities of fat, to chiseling off a couple percentage points. Then they discuss three increasingly popular dietary protocols—ketogenic diets, “if it fits your macros,” and intermittent fasting—from the perspective of fat-loss and muscle preservation.

The best way to learn from these experts is to watch the entire video. Then, if you’d like to refer back to specific sections, use the bookmark links below. Don’t see your question answered here? Shout it out in the comments below so they can address it in the future!

EXPERT PANEL NUTRITION AND DIET TABLE OF CONTENTS

WHO ARE JACOB WILSON AND ROB WILDMAN? – 0:40

WHAT SHOULD I CONSIDER WHEN LOOKING AT DIETS? – 2:25

Losing fat and building muscle at the same time: Is it possible?
Do I have to lose muscle when I diet?
Macronutrients and changing body composition
The two things you need to build muscle and burn fat

WHAT IS THE OPTIMAL PROTEIN INTAKE FOR LOSING FAT? – 6:05

Three meals a day vs. six meals a day
The anabolic effect of protein
The per-meal protein “threshold”
The thermic effect of protein
Other ways protein helps burn calories

HOW SHOULD I DECIDE HOW MANY CALORIES TO EAT? – 9:00

The one-week method to determining “maintenance calories”
How to perform a “self-inventory”
Mifflin-St. Jeor vs. Cunningham
Where to start your caloric deficit
Your starting body composition and fat-loss

WHY IS IT HARDER TO LOSE FAT THE LEANER YOU GET? – 12:14

Your body’s preferred fuel sources and how they can change
Why leaner people need to be careful with caloric deficits
Two supplements that appear to spare muscle tissue when dieting
How to alter your macros and protein intake when calories go down

HOW CAN I BURN FAT AND BUILD MUSCLE AT THE SAME TIME? – 17:40

The importance of cellular signaling and how to take advantage of it
Cardio duration, intensity, and fat-loss
How studies have achieved simultaneous fat-loss and muscle development

HOW SHOULD I OPTIMIZE MY RESISTANCE TRAINING FOR FAT-LOSS AND MUSCLE GAIN? – 20:45

Training frequency: The old way vs. the Norwegian way
How to balance intensity and frequency
The muscle protein synthesis “window” and training experience level
Heavy lifting vs. hypertrophy training
The importance of listening to your body for training—particularly when dieting

KETOGENIC DIETS: WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS AND DRAWBACKS? – 25:05

How most people get it wrong
The importance of fats, and the perfect keto macros
Carb-adapted vs. fat-adapted or “keto-adapted”
How long it takes to get “fat-adapted”
Why very high-protein ketogenic dieting may not work
Ketones and hunger level
New research on ketogenesis and health markers
Ketogenic diets and type 2 diabetes
Why there isn’t just one diet for everyone
New research in carbs and training volume
The problem with weekly cyclic keto diets, and a possible solution

“IF IT FITS YOUR MACROS” (IIFYM): WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS AND DRAWBACKS? – 41:20

What are IIFYM and “flexible dieting?”
“What is sustainable?” vs. “what is optimal?”
What potentially gets lost in IIFYM
The importance of healthy choices
Why your history and “personal inventory” are crucial

INTERMITTENT FASTING (IF): WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS AND DRAWBACKS? – 47:30

The many faces of IF
The importance of muscle and its impact on IF diets
The limitations of existing IF studies
Obese vs. non-obese populations and IF
“Modified” IF protocols for lean athletes

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50 Comments

  1. So I should consume approximately 20g of protein per meal (for example I have 3 meals a day). What if in breakfast and dinner I'm consuming around 10g of proteins, but on lunch like 40g? does that work the same ?

  2. How about dieting and training for competition in the older body builder? Over 60. I am 66 and have been a competitive weightlifter, power lifter, and body builder. As we age our test and gh both decline, we accumulate fat and training is not the same as it was for me in the 30s and 40s age. Can diet help or better said can a particular diet help older lifters etc raise levels of test and GH and return to a reasonable level of training. I know in your roundtable you talked about the resistance training, but I am pretty sure these were younger lifters, and how they responded. Any thoughts? Enjoyed the video, very exciting research.

  3. There are 26 brain dead people who probably couldn't follow. This video validates my knowledge, gives me greater clarity, thank you so much for this informative civil discussion.

    I wish there were more women that were capable of discussions like this…

    ~ Sigh.

  4. Hey guys, The most safe and fastest diet plan that I have ever had was with Jans super plan (i found it on google) Without a doubt the most helpful weight loss plan that I have ever used.

  5. Greetings!!! I am aware that Retin A (Vitmain A) should be consumed in controlled doses because too much creates health issues however when performing heavy duty physical exercise it is okay to increase dosage. But I read that the bodybuilder should EVEN consume more because it is necessary for muscle building . My question is how much more without overdose side effects? Because I am engaging in some high intensity workouts…..6 days a week….3~4.5 hours per day….weightlifting combined with power lifting……can anyone help? thanks fellows……

  6. Wow they put my diet into perspective so nicely. I will definitely intermittent fast and watch my protein intake so that I don't burn muscle. I'm overweight so I'm happy to burn ketones… I'm looking to start resistance training but afraid I'll burn muscle.

  7. Dr. Jacob Wilson – I have been trying to find an answer to this question and maybe you could help? Not good to eat a high fat meal with carbs… it blocks the transportation of triglycerides into the muscle and mitochondria. Q: is this consumption at the same time and if not, how long to wait before consuming carbs? E.g eggs, butter, mackerel and fish oil, say 11am. Training part 2, at say 3pm. Is oatmeal ok, Pwo… or will the carbs be too close to the high fat meal and detrimental to health?

  8. If anyone can correct or add to this, please do so but I'll try to summarize this video as simply as I can.
    1. They discussed what type of workouts work best in terms of maintaining or gaining lean tissue (muscle). It was discussed how someone who is new to training can benefit from a workout that trains one muscle group once a workout. For example: train legs Monday, train arms Tuesday, etc. On the other hand, someone who is more experienced in the gym may want to consider training the same body parts every day or every two days. This means compound workouts or training more than one muscle group at a time will be more beneficial to an experienced gym goer.
    The reason for this is because of the way the muscle repairing process (protein synthesis) affects the two different people. A beginner's body may be repairing itself for the next 3-4 days but for the experienced guy, it can do it in, say, 12 hours. This means the experienced guy should train body parts more often so they don't 'plateau'.
    2. They then covered different types of diets: high carbs vs high fat. The human body can depend on glucose diets (higher carbs) or it can depend on a ketogenic diet (higher fat). Points were given on how a ketogenic diet can have more benefits, like lower cholesterol and lower fat levels in your blood. They also touched on why the QUALITY of the foods you eat is important. For this reason, IIFYM (if it fits your macros) may not be the best choice when dieting.
    3. The end of the discussion was dedicated to intermittent fasting which covered how longer times between meals can be beneficial for some but not recommend for others.
    4. It was also pointed out that it's easier to target fat loss and maintain muscle when you're overweight or obese because of the abundance of resources. In this case, fat.
    I hope this helps you and anyone else who watched this video.

  9. i realy admire doctor jacob but i still believe that ketogenic diet is very harmfull for the health cause ketons are very toxic and the possibility to also lose muscle is high…also ketons can t do the same work as carbs at resistansce training cause the can t suply the body fast energy that you need..

  10. Only thing i question is during intermittent fasting taking BCAAs. Amino acids and protein in general is one of the bodies key indicators that the body has been fed. I would think it would halt enzymes and ketone production during this time. Essentially just making IF useless. Just my opinion. Great video

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