Jogging

Fell running: an introductory guide | Dipbar Fitness Center

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Jogging is a form of trotting or running at a slow or leisurely pace. The main intention is to increase physical fitness with less stress on the body than from faster running but more than walking, or to maintain a steady speed for longer periods of time. Performed over long distances, it is a form of aerobic endurance training.



Jogging is running at a gentle pace. The definition of jogging as compared with running is not standard. One definition describes jogging as running slower than 6 miles per hour (10 km/h). Running is sometimes defined as requiring a moment of no contact to the ground, whereas jogging often sustains the contact.

Jogging is also distinguished from running by having a wider lateral spacing of foot strikes, creating side-to-side movement that likely adds stability at slower speeds or when coordination is lacking.



Jogging may also be used as a warm up or cool down for runners, preceding or following a workout or race. It is often used by serious runners as a means of active recovery during interval training. For example, a runner who completes a fast 400 metre repetition at a sub-5-minute mile pace (3 minute km) may drop to an 8-minute mile jogging pace (5 minute km) for a recovery lap.

Jogging can be used as a method to increase endurance or to provide a means of cardiovascular exercise but with less stress on joints or demand on the circulatory system.









Fell running: an introductory guide

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In Staveley, Cumbria, Morgan Donnelly, 2011 British fell-running champion, talks Kate Carter through the origins of the sport. He outlines the kit you will need and explains that no matter how much experience you have, you will always be welcome at a fell race.

Check the Fell Runners Association website for information on upcoming races.

http://fellrunner.org.uk

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10 Comments

  1. Excellent introduction to fell running! I think all shoe reviewers who review shoes designed for fell running should understand that fell running shoes have thin midsoles because terrain that one runs on provides the cushioning.

  2. Fell running barefeet is crazy given the fact many mt runs are rocky. As regards how to get started,,,find a hill and start to run up it slowly

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